My Island Leguan Blog

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How did we grow up so healthy? April 6, 2015

If you are from Leguan you know that we used to drink water from the pond, we had taps to catch rain water and many people had goblets in their houses to keep the water cool and available.  Oftyen times tadpoles could be seen jumping out the goblet – don’t know where they came from but my mom used to say they keep the water cool and I believed that.  Then we got artesian well and living in phoenix I used to walk to Louisiana not far from school to fetch buckets of water. We used to make this into a social event, walking out with your girlfriends and sometimes your boyfriend would meet you there and while you fetching the water on yuh head he pushing his bike or riding slowly besides you. It was soc much fun growing up in Leguan. I remember my childhood as fondly.

Today there is all kinds of talk about bad water, drinking purified water and this and that is bad for you. Sometimes the little germs we might have gotten is what is keeping us alive and healthy today.  I don’t believe all the crap these western people are talking about.   And remember growing up we used to see the doctor only when we are sick.  There was nothing like yearly checkup – not in my house.  Do you have memories?  Please share

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2 Responses to “How did we grow up so healthy?”

  1. Aptie Sookoo Says:

    Yes! It is quite interesting to read your article and to reflect on my earlier life in Enterprise, Leguan. Indeed, my brothers, sisters, friends and neighbours had daily baths around our man-made pond that was located to the back of our property. The pond had a veil of buoyant aquatic weeds, a canopy created by a large bat-seed and monkey apple tree respectively and minimal biotic diversity that prohibited the breeding of mosquitoes. We were forbidden to swim in it, so we had to use a bucket to collect the water and then we had a bath. I still remember our neighbours as they walked along a meandering track to access our pond and how we greeted them. I do believe that many of us un-intentionally swallowed small volumes of the pond water and never had diarrhoeal episodes. Rain water is safe providing the roof (catchment area) from which it is collected is clean. There is a ton of fugitive dust that settles on metal roofs; chemicals etc. let alone bird droppings that may contain pathogenic bacteria particularly E. coli. A good practice is always to allow the first set of rain water to run to waste (approximately 5≥10 minutes) before you start to fill the receptacles. How safe the rain water is, is heavily dependent upon the location of the building relative to industrial operations that spill toxic by-products through their chimneys etc. Incidentally, I have two 450 gallon water tanks (connected by series) at my property on the West Coast Demerara and they are used to store storm water. I continue to drink from those receptacles whenever I am at home. The tadpoles that emerged in water receptacles such as goblets, rain barrels etc. were the immature stage of frogs. They unwittingly were used as bio-monitors for the old folks knew that if several frogs/tadpoles died then the water was unfit for drinking. Today science has taught us to measure toxicity by LD50 as well as LC50 etc. It is quite true, that we cannot live in a bubble; we have to be exposed to various pathogens at preferably low doses, so that the body can develop immunity against them. Medical science has advanced far beyond what was known in the fifties, sixties and continues to discover new understanding about the disease model; patient care management; sequelae etc. I recall the period of time when I used to fetch water from a shallow well that was located in front the police station. It was only functional during the time when the tide was in and I understood that to mean, that its source was tide dependent. This activity initiated immense social interaction among fellow cohorts and offered an indirect platform for physical exercise and balance. Yes! Routine medical examination is important as it helps in identifying many chronic non communicable diseases in their early stages and with modern therapy, either reverses the situation or initiates control to the benefit of the patient and the health care system. Merry Christmas and bright and Prosperous New Year to you and your family and God bless…

  2. Aptie Sookoo Says:

    Yes! It is quite interesting to read your article and to reflect on my earlier life in Enterprise, Leguan. Indeed, my brothers, sisters, friends and neighbours had daily baths around our man-made pond that was located to the back of our property. The pond had a veil of buoyant aquatic weeds, a canopy created by a large bat-seed and monkey apple tree respectively and minimal biotic diversity that prohibited the breeding of mosquitoes. We were forbidden to swim in it, so we had to use a bucket to collect the water and then we had a bath. I still remember our neighbours as they walked along a meandering track to access our pond and how we greeted them. I do believe that many of us un-intentionally swallowed some volumes of the pond water and never had diarrhoeal episodes. Rain water is safe providing the roof (catchment area) from which it is collected is clean. There is a ton of fugitive dust that settles on metal roofs; chemicals etc. let alone bird droppings that may contain pathogenic bacteria particularly E. coli. A good practice is always to allow the first set of rain water to run to waste (approximately 5≥10 minutes) before you start to fill the receptacles. How safe the rain water is, is heavily dependent upon the location of the building relative to industrial operations that spill toxic by-products through their chimneys etc. Incidentally, I have two 450 gallon water tanks (connected by series) at my property on the West Coast Demerara and they are used to store storm water. I continue to drink from those receptacles whenever I am at home. The tadpoles that emerged in water receptacles such as goblets, rain barrels etc. were the immature stage of frogs. They unwittingly were used as bio-monitors for the old folks knew that if several frogs/tadpoles died then the water was unfit for drinking. Today science has taught us to measure toxicity by LD50 as well as LC50 etc. It is quite true, that we cannot live in a bubble; we have to be exposed to various pathogens at preferably low doses, so that the body can develop immunity against them. Medical science has advanced far beyond what was known in the fifties, sixties and continues to discover new understanding about the disease model; patient care management; sequelae etc. I recall the period of time when I used to fetch water from a shallow well that was located in front the police station. It was only functional during the time when the tide was in and I understood that to mean, that its source was tide dependent. This activity initiated immense social interaction among fellow villagers and offered an indirect platform for physical exercise and balance. Yes! Routine medical examination is important as it helps in identifying many chronic non communicable diseases in their early stages and with modern therapy, either reverses the situation or initiates control to the benefit of the patient and the health care system. Merry Christmas and bright and Prosperous New Year to you and your family and God bless…


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